Danko Nikolić, short CV

I received a degree in Psychology (1994) and a degree in Civil Engineering (1992) from the University of Zagreb, Croatia.

My masters degree (1997) and a Ph.D. (1999) I received form a Department of Psychology, at the University of Oklahoma, USA.

In 1999 I joined the Department of Neurophysiology at the Max-Planck Institute for Brain Research and soon after started a pioneering work on highly parallel recordings from cat visual cortex by using multiple Michigan probes simultaneously.

Since July 2016 I am working at CSC as Data Scientists, reflecting my growing interest in AI and machine learning. I still have an appointment as Research Fellow at Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies.

In 2010 I received a Private Docent title from the University of Zagreb, and in 2014 an Associate Professor title from the same university.

For a period of two years I was funded by Alexander von Humboldt-Stiftung. My research was supported by grants from the Hertie Foundation, Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG) and other sources.

Influences:
The book that probably had the biggest influence on my thinking about mind, brain and AI was:

Dreyfus, H. L. (1972). What computers can’t do. New York: MIT Press.

It is an attempt to solve the problems posed in this book that led to the development of the theory of practopoiesis.

Perhaps the second most influential book on me was:

Dawkins, R. (1989). The selfish gene. 1976. revised edn. Oxford.

This book imprinted into me a deep respect for the interactions between the organism and its environment. If you use the principles from The Selfish Gene and apply them to solve the problems from What Computers Can’t Do, practopoiesis comes out as a result.

Trivia: My Erdos number is 3.